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Albert Bierstadt - Lake Tahoe, (1868), Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Masters of Art: Albert Bierstadt (1830 – 1902)

Albert Bierstadt (January 7, 1830 – February 18, 1902) was a German-American painter best known for his lavish, sweeping landscapes of the American West. In obtaining the subject matter for these works, Bierstadt joined several journeys of the Westward Expansion. Though not the first artist to record these sites, Bierstadt was the foremost painter of these scenes for the remainder of the 19th century.

Albert Bierstadt - Among the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, (1868), Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC.

Albert Bierstadt – Among the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, (1868), Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC.

Bierstadt was part of the Hudson River School, not an institution but rather an informal group of like-minded painters. The Hudson River School style involved carefully detailed paintings with romantic, almost glowing lighting, sometimes called luminism. An important interpreter of the western landscape, Bierstadt, along with Thomas Moran, is also grouped with the Rocky Mountain School.

Bierstadt was born in Solingen, Germany. His family moved to New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1831. He developed a taste for art early and made clever crayon sketches in his youth. In 1851, he began to paint in oils. He studied painting with the members of the Düsseldorf school of painting in Düsseldorf from 1853 to 1857. He taught drawing and painting briefly before devoting himself to painting.

Bierstadt began making paintings in New England and upstate New York. In 1859, he traveled westward in the company of Frederick W. Lander, a land surveyor for the U.S. government, returning with sketches that would result in numerous finished paintings. In 1863 he returned west again, in the company of the author Fitz Hugh Ludlow, whose wife he would later marry. He continued to visit the American West throughout his career.

Though his paintings sold for princely sums, Bierstadt was not held in particularly high esteem by critics of his day. His use of uncommonly large canvases was thought to be an egotistical indulgence, as his paintings would invariably dwarf those of his contemporaries when they were displayed together. The romanticism evident in his choices of subject and in his use of light was felt to be excessive by contemporary critics. His paintings emphasized atmospheric elements like fog, clouds and mist to accentuate and complement the feel of his work. Bierstadt sometimes changed details of the landscape to inspire awe. The colors he used are also not always true. He painted what he believed was the way things should be: water is ultramarine, vegetation is lush and green, etc.

Nonetheless, in 1860 he was elected a member of the National Academy; he received medals in Austria, Bavaria, Belgium, and Germany; and his paintings remain popular.

He was a prolific artist, having completed over 500 (possibly as many as 4000) paintings during his lifetime, most of which have survived. Many are scattered through museums around the United States. Prints are available commercially for many. Original paintings themselves do occasionally come up for sale, at ever increasing prices.

In 1882 his studio at Irvington, New York, was destroyed by fire, with many of his pictures.

Because of Bierstadt’s interest in mountain landscapes, Mount Bierstadt and Bierstadt Lake in Colorado are named in his honor. Bierstadt was probably the first European to visit the summit of Mount Evans in 1863, 1.5 miles from Mount Bierstadt. Bierstadt named it Mount Rosa, a reference to both Monte Rosa above Zermatt and, Rosalie Ludlow, his future wife, but the name was changed from Rosalie to Evans in 1895 in honor of Colorado governor John Evans.

 

Albert Bierstadt - Staubbach Falls, Near Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland, 1865

Albert Bierstadt – Staubbach Falls, Near Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland, 1865

Hope you enjoyed the article as much as i did compiling the info and the images! See you next time!

Articles’ Images are in the public domain because their copyright has expired or are displayed here under the “ fair use” copyright law, and are available through WikipediaWikimedia.

This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

Article publié pour la première fois le 05/03/2013

Francisco Goya - Dance of the Majos at the Banks of Manzanares

Life and Paintings of Francisco Goya (1746 – 1828)

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (30 March 1746–16 April 1828) was a Spanish romantic painter and printmaker regarded both as the last of the Old Masters and the first of the moderns. Goya was a court painter to the Spanish Crown, and through his works was both a commentator on and chronicler of his era. The subversive and imaginative element in his art, as well as his bold handling of paint, provided a model for the work of later generations of artists, notably Manet, Picasso and Francis Bacon.. In his honour, Spain’s main national film awards are called the Goya Awards.

Movements: Romanticism

London’s Street Art Square Mile 4

London’s Street Art Square Mile

Had enough of the Tate Modern and National Portrait Gallery? Some of the best art in London can be found on outside the galleries. Right next to the Square Mile – London’s shiny financial district – lays an alternative square mile, containing some of the city’s most eye-popping street art. Here street artists from around the world lay claim to the peeling billboards and crumbling walls of Hackney and Shoreditch, painting, chiselling, pasting and installing their fingerprints onto the cityscape. As anyone who lives there knows, the work of certain artists starts to follow you around and sticks in your mind. Here are the main examples and where you can find them.

Roa

Hackney Road

Jumping out at you from the walls of Hackney, Roa’s intricate black and white animals harshly confront us with our turbulent relationship with the natural world. Most of the Ghent-based street artist’s work is legal (with prior permission arranged) so the pieces tend to stick around longer than most and become a permanent fixture of a constantly-shifting landscape. Both the rabbit on Hackney Road and the sacred crane on Hanbury Street caused uproar when there was talk of painting over them, and both were saved by passionate petitions.

Stik

Stik’s strikingly simple but expressive figures show that art doesn’t have to be complex to be effective. His gigantic androgynous paintings appear everywhere from shop fronts to sides of buildings and even people’s houses. Stik was homeless for a while, and his time spent observing people must contribute to the human emotion that these characters convey. One of the best examples is on Princlet Street, which shows two communities living side by side in the Brick Lane area.

“Beauty is in movement. That’s what it’s about. Beauty is about the way that someone moves their body. You can tell by someone’s walk if they’re angry, whether they’re happy or if they’ve just eaten. You can tell a lot about someone just by the way they’re moving their back or their eyes.”

 

Princlet Street (off Brick Lane)

Vhils

Taking street art to new levels of technical mastery, Portugese street artist Alexandre Farto has been scalpeling, drilling and chiselling away at the crumbling walls of Shoreditch for several years, producing lifelike portraits etched into the very fabric of the city itself. His subjects are not the politicians and celebrities of countless billboard advertisements. They are the ‘everyday heroes’, the people we pass on the Tube whose names we don’t know, living out their lives. As our walls get thicker with layers of advertisements, graffiti paint and whitewash, Vhils strips these layers away again, revealing what lies underneath. Check out his exploding murals.

The Old Truman Brewery

Christiaan Nagel

Old Street Roundabout

Street art can be sculpture as well as painting, as South African Christiaan Nagel’s brightly coloured mushrooms make perfectly clear. Look up at the roofs and tops of buildings of Old Street and you’ll see these unlikely urban fungii popping up everywhere. Made from polyurethane (surfboard foam), fibreglass and stainless steel, they represent new creative ideas, appearing out of nowhere and flourishing in sometimes unlikely circumstances. “There is an element of randomness in any idea, that part we don’t have a choice in. Just like wild mushrooms, ideas pop-up.” Check out his mushroom sculptures for sale on is website.

Invader

Brick Lane

One of the true originals, French street artist Invader has been installing his surveillance drones around cities worldwide for over a decade. His pixelated Space Invaders mosaics can be found in high up, high visibility areas, their sinister gaze providing a fitting commentary on the paranoid, surveillance culture in which we live. There’s estimated to be around 40 around London, assembled in advance and quickly installed, which you’ll start to spot when you tune into their specific vibrations. Ironically, almost nothing about Invader is known.

Images are provided by the Author

Article by Matt Lindley

Written by Matt Lindley on behalf of  HotelClub London.

Article publié pour la première fois le 01/03/2013

Piet Mondrian, Composition No. 10, 1939-42, oil on canvas, 80 x 73 cm, private collection.

History of Modern Art: Minimalism

Minimalism describes movements in various forms of art and design, especially visual art and music, where the work is set out to expose the essence or identity of a subject through eliminating all non-essential forms, features or concepts. Minimalism is any design or style in which the simplest and fewest elements are used to create the maximum effect.

As a specific movement in the arts it is identified with developments in post–World War II Western Art, most strongly with American visual arts in the 1960s and early 1970s. Prominent artists associated with this movement include Donald Judd, John McCracken, Agnes Martin, Dan Flavin, Robert Morris, Anne Truitt, and Frank Stella. It is rooted in the reductive aspects of Modernism, and is often interpreted as a reaction against Abstract expressionism and a bridge to Postminimal art practices.

Edwin Lord Weeks - Along The Ghats Mathura

Life and Paintings of Edwin Lord Weeks (1849 -1903)

Edwin Lord Weeks - An Indian Hunting Party

Edwin Lord Weeks – An Indian Hunting Party

Edwin Lord Weeks (1849 – 1903) was an american artist distinguished as a painter of oriental scenesWell he was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1849. Weeks’ parents were affluent spice and tea merchants from Newton, a suburb of Boston and as such they were able to accept, probably encourage, and certainly finance their son’s youthful interest in painting and travelling. As a young man Edwin Lord Weeks visited the Florida Keys to draw and also travelled to Surinam in South America. His earliest known paintings date from 1867 when Weeks was eighteen years old, although it is not until his Landscape with Blue Heron, dated 1871 and painted in the Everglades, that Weeks started to exhibit a dexterity of technique and eye for composition—presumably having taken professional tuition.

He relocated to Europe in 1872, and studied in Paris, where he was a pupil of Léon Bonnat and Jean-Léon Gérôme. He made many voyages to the East, and was distinguished as a painter of oriental scenes.

Edwin Lord Weeks - Moorish Girl Lying on a Couch

Edwin Lord Weeks – Moorish Girl Lying on a Couch

In 1895, he wrote and illustrated a book of travels, From the Black Sea through Persia and India, and two years later he published Episodes of Mountaineering. He died in November 1903. He was a member of the Légion d’honneur, France, an officer of the Order of St. Michael, Germany, and a member of the Secession, Munich.

Let’s enjoy some of his most stunning works.

 

Edwin Lord Weeks - The Return Of The Imperial Court From The Great Mosque At Delhi

Edwin Lord Weeks – The Return Of The Imperial Court From The Great Mosque At Delhi

 

Edwin Lord Weeks - Sketch Two Nautch Girls

Edwin Lord Weeks – Sketch Two Nautch Girls

 

Edwin Lord Weeks - The Last Voyage

 

Edwin Lord Weeks - Interior of the Mosque at Cordova

Edwin Lord Weeks – Interior of the Mosque at Cordova

 

Edwin Lord Weeks - Festival at Fatehpur Sikri

Edwin Lord Weeks – Festival at Fatehpur Sikri

 

Edwin Lord Weeks - Along The Ghats Mathura

Edwin Lord Weeks – Along The Ghats Mathura

 

Edwin Lord Weeks - Two Arabs Reading in a Courtyard

Edwin Lord Weeks – Two Arabs Reading in a Courtyard

 

 

Edwin Lord Weeks - An Open-Air Restaurant Lahore

Edwin Lord Weeks – An Open-Air Restaurant Lahore

 

Hope you enjoyed the article as much as i did compiling the info and the images! See you next time!

Articles’ Images are in the public domain because their copyright has expired or are displayed here under the “ fair use” copyright law, and are available through WikipediaWikimedia.

This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

Article publié pour la première fois le 20/08/2014

Loic Zimmermann→Illustration works, 2008-20092

Amazing Fantasy Illustrations by Loic Zimmermann

Loic e338 Zimmermann is a French Concept Artist and 3D Supervisor (he was named Maya Master by Autodesk in 2009), working on movies in Los Angeles : Xmen FC, Thor, True Grit, Percy Jackson, Underworld, Wolverine, Book of Eli…

His illustrations have been published in many magazines and books and his personal works has been shown in exhibitions in France, England, Germany, canada and the US with his first Solo Show in Downtown LA last year.

Loic is increasingly focusing on his own artistic journey, a place where digital tools meet silkscreen, painting and collage.

Let’s enjoy his amazing works! And as always you can find more at his Behance Portfolio!

Hope you enjoyed today’s article! Looking forward to hear which one is your favourite! See you next time!

 (Images are displayed here because they are licensed by their creator under Creative commons – Attribution. Exclusively to showcase and promote the artists work!)

Article publié pour la première fois le 01/06/2014

Sectionals

Best Implementable DIY Ideas For Your Living Room

If you no longer get ‘stunned’ seeing your living room or if you feel stressed looking at the mess and poor arrangement of stuff and furniture in it, maybe this is the time that you do a face-lift! Your living room is your place of refuge after a hard day at work. Isn’t it nice to sit on a lovely couch, have some chips and a beer while watching your favorite TV show? But all the comfort and stress-relieving benefits of having your own living room can all be turned into waste if it doesn’t have any sense of order, style, and beauty.

The best thing is – you don’t have to hire a professional interior designer to add beauty to your living room! There are simple DIY design ideas that you can implement in your very own living space. Here are some of them:

  • Rearrange the sectionals. Sectionals are modern types of chair that are widely used in various home environments. Sectionals are a great choice because it gives you flexibility and makes it easy to rearrange any time you wish. You can revamp your living room just by rearranging the position of your sectional chairs. As easy as that! What if you don’t have sectionals at home? Well, maybe it’s time that you consider buying one!
  • Use silver trays. Having a collection of silver trays in your living room gives it a modern and very artistic appeal. Silver ornaments are very eye-catching and they could give an elegant look to your living space. Don’t like silver? Then have a collection of a design that you love. Whether it’s some Asian-inspired rugs, indoor plants, figurines, vases, etc. Just make sure they go hand in hand with the rest of the décor in your home.
  • Add beautiful flowers. Perk up your room with a bouquet of vibrant flowers placed in an equally vibrant vase! You have a choice whether to use real flowers or just synthetic ones. Synthetic flowers are good since that they don’t rot and don’t need maintenance (water, sunlight, and soil). But nothing beats the beauty of real flowers. They produce a scent that doesn’t just uplift the beauty of your living room but also provides therapeutic effects.
  • Create hand-painted wallpaper. Designing your wall with hand painted figures is easy as creating a stencil and painting it by hand. This can free you away from the messy effects of traditional wallpaper available in the market.
  • Get your chairs fixed. Wobbly chairs can cause great annoyance in your living room. The great thing is that you really don’t have to hire a handyman to get them all fixed. If the foam is the problem, you can replace it with similar foam that you can purchase from home stores. If you don’t like the covering, look for unused clothes in around your home. Fabrics with cute large and colorful prints work best for stools and single chairs.
  • Create an indoor garden. Is it too hot to make a traditional garden outside? Then do it in your very own living room! Consider planting potted herbs like basil, sage and rosemary. You can either buy or construct a plant rack to be placed in your living room.
  • Add slipcovers to your sectionals. A slipcover is the cheapest way to revamp your existing sectionals at home. Buy at least two sets of slipcovers so if you get tired with the old one, you can replace it easily! Don’t forget to measure the chairs correctly so you could find the best slipcover that perfectly fits it. Choose the design that suits the overall theme of your living room.
  • Update your window treatment. A change of draperies is another cheap way to lift up the beauty of your living room. If you’re used to traditional heavy, thick and dark-colored curtains, try something that’s lighter, thinner and more refreshing to the eyes. Consider using curtain rods. They are easy to install and remove and are very convenient to maintain.

Add a pattern on your floor. Vinyl materials are great additions to existing floors. You can also use wood panel to add an elegant touch. Another way is to place an area rug on different areas. They are cheap, easy to use and are very attractive!

Article by Jess Ross

Myself Jess Ross is graduated with a double major in English and Business Management from the University of Ohio. A Columbus native, I went back to my home city after graduation to work in several advertising companies, before striking it out on my own in Shanghai, China, working for an International furniture manufacturing company in East Asia. I helped increase the company’s sales by 30% and began expanding into Europe and North America. After working in China for a number of years, I moved back to Columbus. I worked for my family’s another store (www.SofasandSectionals.Com)(888-567-7632), and worked to expand their markets as well as their offerings into more like sofas, sectionals, couches, loveseats and much more.

Article publié pour la première fois le 20/04/2013

Claude-Joseph Vernet - Shipwreck In a Stormy_Sea by the Coast

Life and Paintings of Claude-Joseph Vernet (1714 – 1789)

Claude-Joseph Vernet (14 August 1714 – 3 December 1789) was a French painter. His son, Antoine Charles Horace Vernet, was also a painter.

Vernet was born in Avignon. By fourteen years of age he aided his father Antoine Vernet (a skilled decorative painter) in the most important parts of his work. The panels of sedan chairs, however, could not satisfy his ambition, and Vernet started for Rome. The sight of the sea at Marseilles and his voyage thence to Civitavecchia (Papal States’ main port on the Tyrrhenian Sea) made a deep impression on him, and immediately after his arrival he entered the studio of a marine painter, Bernardino Fergioni.

Claude-Joseph Vernet - Landscape with Bathers (detail)

Claude-Joseph Vernet – Landscape with Bathers (detail)

Claude-Joseph Vernet - Landscape with Bathers

Claude-Joseph Vernet – Landscape with Bathers

Slowly Vernet attracted notice in the artistic milieu of Rome. With a certain conventionality in design, proper to his day, he allied the results of constant and honest observation of natural effects of atmosphere, which he rendered with unusual pictorial art. Perhaps no painter of landscapes or sea-pieces has ever made the human figure so completely a part of the scene depicted or so important a factor in his design. In this respect he was heavily influenced by Giovanni Paolo Panini, whom he probably met and worked with in Rome. Vernet’s work draws on natural themes, but in a way that is neither sentimental nor emotive. The overall effect of his style is wholly decorative. “Others may know better”, he said, with just pride, “how to paint the sky, the earth, the ocean; no one knows better than I how to paint a picture”. His style remained relatively static throughout his life. His works’ attentiveness to atmospheric effects is combined with a sense of harmony that is reminiscent of Claude Lorrain.

Claude-Joseph Vernet - Shipwreck In a Stormy_Sea by the Coast

Claude-Joseph Vernet – Shipwreck In a Stormy_Sea by the Coast

For twenty years Vernet lived in Rome, producing views of seaports, storms, calms, moonlights, becoming especially popular with English aristocrats, many of whom were on the Grand Tour. In 1745 he married an Englishwoman whom he met in the city. In 1753 he was recalled to Paris: there, by royal command, he executed the series of the seaports of France (now in the Louvre and the Musée national de la Marine) by which he is best known. His The Port of Rochefort (1763, Musée national de la Marine) is particularly notable; in the piece Vernet is able to achieve, according to art historian Michael Levey, one of his most ‘crystalline and atmospherically sensitive skies’. Vernet has attempted to bring the foreground of his work to life through painting a wide array of figures engaging in a variety of activities, endeavouring to convey a sense of the commotion and drama of France’s seaports. Throughout his life Vernet returned to Italian themes, as shown through one of his later works – A Seashore (National Gallery). On his return from Rome he became a member of the academy, but he had previously contributed to the exhibitions of 1746 and following years, and he continued to exhibit, with rare exceptions, down to the date of his death, which took place in his lodgings in the Louvre on the 3rd of December 1789. Amongst the very numerous engravers of his works may be specially cited Le Bas, Cochin, Basan, Duret, Flipart and Le Veau in France, and in England Vivares.

 

Claude-Joseph Vernet - a Seashore

Claude-Joseph Vernet – a Seashore

 

Claude-Joseph Vernet - Storm with a Shipwreck

Claude-Joseph Vernet – Storm with a Shipwreck

 

Claude-Joseph Vernet - Shipwreck

Claude-Joseph Vernet – Shipwreck

 

Claude-Joseph Vernet - Shepherd In the Alps

Claude-Joseph Vernet – Shepherd In the Alps

 

Hope you enjoyed the article as much as i did compiling the info and the images! See you next time!

Articles’ Images are in the public domain because their copyright has expired or are displayed here under the “ fair use” copyright law, and are available through WikipediaWikimedia.

This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

Article publié pour la première fois le 06/01/2014

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Susanna and the Elders

Masters of Art: Guercino (1591 – 1666)

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (February 8, 1591 – December 22, 1666), best known as Guercino or Il Guercino, was an Italian Baroque painter and draftsman from the region of Emilia, and active in Rome and Bologna. The vigorous naturalism of his early manner is in contrast to the classical equilibrium of his later works. His many drawings are noted for their luminosity and lively style.

Movements: Baroque,  Emotionalism, Classicism

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Et in Arcadia Ego

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – Et in Arcadia Ego

He was born at Cento, a village between Bologna and Ferrara. At an early age he acquired the nickname Guercino (Italian for ‘squinter’) because he was cross-eyed.

Mainly self-taught, he was apprenticed at the age of 16 to Benedetto Gennari, a painter of the Bolognese School. By 1615 he had moved to Bologna, where his work gained the praise of an elder Ludovico Carracci. Guercino painted two large canvases, Elijah Fed by Ravens and Samson Seized by Philistines, in what appears to be a stark naturalist Caravaggesque style (although it is unlikely he had been able to see any of the Roman Caravaggios first-hand). They were painted for Cardinal Serra, Papal Legate to Ferrara.

The Arcadian Shepherds (Et in Arcadia ego) was painted in 1618 contemporary with The Flaying of Marsyas by Apollo in Palazzo Pitti. Its dramatic composition is typical of Guercino’s early works, which are often tumultuous. His first style, he often claimed, was influenced by a canvas of Annibale Carracci in Cento. Some of his later pieces approach rather to the manner of his contemporary Guido Reni, and are painted with more lightness and clearness.

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Angels Weeping over the Dead Christ

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – Angels Weeping over the Dead Christ

He was recommended by Marchese Enzo Bentivoglio to the Bolognese Ludovisi Pope, Pope Gregory XV. The two years he spent in Rome, 1621–23, were very productive. From this period came his frescoes of Aurora at the casino of the Villa Ludovisi and the ceiling in San Crisogono (1622) of San Chrysogonus in Glory; his portrait of Pope Gregory (now in the Getty Museum, and, what is considered his masterpiece, The Burial of Saint Petronilla or St. Petronilla Altarpiece, for the Vatican (now in the Museo Capitolini).

After the death of Gregory XV, Guercino returned to his hometown. In 1626 he began his frescoes in the Duomo of Piacenza. The details of his career after 1629 are well documented in the account book, the Libro dei conti, that Guercino and his brother, Paolo Antonio Barbieri, kept and which has been preserved.

In 1642, following the death of Guido Reni in Bologna, Guercino moved his busy workshop to that city and become its principal painter. The Franciscan order of Reggio in 1655 paid him 300 ducats for the altarpiece of Saint Luke Displaying a Painting of the Madonna and Child (now in Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City). The Corsini also paid him 300 ducats for the Flagellation of Christ painted in 1657.

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Virgin and Child with Four Saints

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – Virgin and Child with Four Saints

He was remarkable for the extreme rapidity of his execution—he completed no fewer than 106 large altar-pieces for churches, and his other paintings amount to about 144. He was a prolific draftsman who made many drawings, usually in ink, ink with wash, or red chalk. Most were made as preparatory studies for his paintings, but for his own enjoyment he also drew landscapes, genre subjects, and caricatures. His drawings are noted for their fluent style in which “rapid, calligraphic pen strokes combined with dots, dashes, and parallel hatching lines describe the forms”.

Let’s now enjoy his most celebrated works

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - The Martyrdom of St Peter

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – The Martyrdom of St Peter

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Susanna and the Elders

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – Susanna and the Elders

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - St William of Aquitaine Receiving the Cowl

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – St William of Aquitaine Receiving the Cowl

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - St Peter Weeping before the Virgin

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – St Peter Weeping before the Virgin

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Semiramis Receiving Word of the Revolt of Babylon

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – Semiramis Receiving Word of the Revolt of Babylon

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Samson Captured by the Philistines

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – Samson Captured by the Philistines

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Madonna of the Swallow

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – Madonna of the Swallow

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) - Abraham Casting Out Hagar and Ishmael

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) – Abraham Casting Out Hagar and Ishmael

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) -The Toilet of Venus

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (Guercino) -The Toilet of Venus

Guercino continued to paint and teach up to the time of his death in 1666, amassing a notable fortune. As he never married, his estate passed to his nephews, Benedetto Gennari II and Cesare Gennari.

Hope you enjoyed the article as much as i did compiling the info and the images! See you next time!
Articles’ Images are in the public domain because their copyright has expired, and are available through Wikimedia

This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

Article publié pour la première fois le 13/11/2012

Ary Scheffer - Battle

Life and Paintings of Ary Scheffer (1795 – 1858)

Ary Scheffer (10 February 1795 – 15 June 1858), French painter of Dutch and German extraction, was born in Dordrecht.

After the early death of his father Johann Baptist, a poor painter, Ary’s mother Cornelia, herself a painter and daughter of landscapist Arie Lamme, took him to Paris and placed him in the studio of Pierre-Narcisse Guérin. When Scheffer left Guérin’s studio, Romanticism had come into vogue in France, with such painters as Xavier Sigalon, Eugène Delacroix and Théodore Géricault. Scheffer did not show much affinity with their work and developed his own style, which has been called “frigidly classical”.

Ary Scheffer - Self portrait

Ary Scheffer – Self portrait

Scheffer often painted subjects from literature, especially the works of Dante, Byron and Goethe. Two versions of Dante and Beatrice and have been preserved at Wolverhampton Art Gallery, United Kingdom, and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, USA. Particularly highly praised was his Francesca da Rimini painted in 1836. Ary Sheffer’s popular Faust-themed paintings include Margaret at her wheel; Faust doubting; Margaret at the Sabbat; Margaret leaving church; The garden walk, and Margaret at the well. In 1836, he painted two pictures of Goethe’s character Mignon.

He now turned to religious subjects: Christus Consolator (1836) was followed by Christus Remunerator, The shepherds led by the star (1837), The Magi laying down their crowns, Christ in the Garden of Olives, Christ bearing his Cross, Christ interred (1845), and St Augustine and Monica (1846).

His Christus Consolator, lost for 70 years, was rediscovered in a janitor’s closet in Gethsemane Lutheran Church in Dassel, Minnesota in 2007. It has been restored and is on display at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

Ary Scheffer - The Ghosts of Paolo and Francesca Appear to Dante and Virgil

Ary Scheffer – The Ghosts of Paolo and Francesca Appear to Dante and Virgil

Scheffer was also an accomplished portrait painter. His subjects included composers Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt, the Marquis de la Fayette, Pierre-Jean de Béranger, Alphonse de Lamartine, Charles Dickens, Duchess de Broglie, Talleyrand and Queen Marie Amélie.

After 1846, he ceased to exhibit. His strong ties with the royal family caused him to fall out of favour when, in 1848, the Second Republic came into being. Shut up in his studio, he produced many paintings that were only exhibited after his death, which took place at Argenteuil on the 15th of June 1858. He is buried in the Cimetière de Montmartre.

Ary Scheffer - Faust and Marguerite in the Garden

Ary Scheffer – Faust and Marguerite in the Garden

The works first exhibited posthumously include Sorrows of the earth, and the Angel announcing the Resurrection, which he had left unfinished. By the time of his death, his reputation was damaged: though his paintings were praised for their charm and facility, they were condemned for poor use of color and vapid sentiment.

Scheffer was married to the widow of General Baudrand. His brother Hendrik, born at the Hague on 27 September 1798, was also a prolific painter. Scheffer was made commander of the Legion of Honour in 1848, that is, after he had wholly withdrawn from the Salon.

 

Ary Scheffer - Margaret at the Fountain

Ary Scheffer – Margaret at the Fountain

 

Ary Scheffer - The Death of Gericault

Ary Scheffer – The Death of Gericault

 

Ary Scheffer - Portrait De Mme Frederick Kent

Ary Scheffer – Portrait De Mme Frederick Kent

 

Ary Scheffer - Macbeth et Les Sorcieres

Ary Scheffer – Macbeth et Les Sorcieres

 

Ary Scheffer - Battle

Ary Scheffer – Battle

 

Ary Scheffer - Santa Monique and Saint Augustin

Ary Scheffer – Santa Monique and Saint Augustin

 

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This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

Article publié pour la première fois le 02/01/2014

Jan Van Eyck - Self-portrait

Masters of Art: Jan Van Eyck (1395 – 1441)

Jan van Eyck (or Johannes de Eyck)(c. 1395 –  1441) was a Flemish painter active in Bruges and is generally considered one of the most significant Northern European painters of the 15th century. The few surviving records indicate that he was born around 1390, most likely in Maaseik. Little is known of his early life, but his activities following his appointment to the court of Philip the Good c. 1425 are comparatively well documented.

Movements: Renaissance, Naturalism

Jan Van Eyck - Self-portrait

Jan Van Eyck – Self-portrait

Van Eyck had previously served John of Bavaria-Straubing, then ruler of Holland, Hainault and Zeeburg. By this time van Eyck had assembled a workshop and was involved in redecorating the Binnenhof palace in The Hague. He moved to Bruges sometime around 1425 and there came to the attention of Philip the Good. He served as both court artist and diplomat and became a senior member of the Tournai painters’ guild, where he enjoyed the company of similarly esteemed artists such as Robert Campin and Rogier van der Weyden. Over the following decade van Eyck’s reputation and technical ability grew, mostly from his innovative approaches towards the handling and manipulating of oil paint.

His revolutionary approach to oil was such that a myth, perpetuated by Giorgio Vasari, arose that he had invented oil painting.

It is known from historical record that van Eyck was considered a revolutionary master across northern Europe within his lifetime; his designs and methods were heavily copied and reproduced. His motto, one of the first and still most distinctive signatures in art history, “ALS IK KAN” (“AS I CAN”) first appeared in 1433 on Portrait of a Man in a Turban, which is most likely a self portrait and indicative of his emerging self confidence at the time.

The years between 1434 and 1436 are generally considered his high point when he produced works including the Madonna of Chancellor Rolin, Lucca Madonna and Virgin and Child with Canon van der Paele. That year he married the much younger Margaret. Records from 1437 on suggest that he was held in high esteem by the upper ranks of Burgundian nobility while also accepting many foreign commissions. He died young in July 1441, leaving behind many unfinished works to be completed by workshop journeymen; works that are nevertheless today considered major examples of Early Netherlandish painting. His local and international reputation was aided by his ties to the then political and cultural influence of the Burgundian court.

Lets enjoy some of his most important works:

St Jerome

St Jerome

Madonna mit dem lesenden Kinde

Madonna mit dem lesenden Kinde

Madonna des Kanonikus Georg van der Paele

Madonna des Kanonikus Georg van der Paele

Madonna at the Fountain

Madonna at the Fountain

Die Stigmatisation des Hl. Franziskus

Die Stigmatisation des Hl. Franziskus

Hope you enjoyed the article as much as i did compiling the info and the images! See you next time!

Articles’ Images are in the public domain because their copyright has expired, and are available through Wikimedia

This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

Article publié pour la première fois le 03/08/2012

tribal art

Western Painting – Tribal Art, Native Art from the West

Tribal Art is the objects and artifacts made by the tribes in the rural areas, for religious reasons rather than as an example of artistry. Its numerous uses differ from tribe to tribe. They could be used to decorate objects of daily use or can even be used for spiritual ceremonial functions. Very often tribes are isolated from civilisations, with no tradition of literacy. Hence, art is a good way to demonstrate and preserve tribal traditions, mythology, and history. In the Western Art scene, the most widely known Tribal Art categories are from the tribes of the remote areas of Central and South America. While the primary influence on Tribal Art is the geography and the climate of a region, the social and religious needs of a tribe and the availability of resources are also other important factors determining its evolution and proliferation. Because there is no access to technology, the artisans use hand-tools made of materials, like stone, wood, tusks, bones, skin of animals, dyes made from minerals, baskets woven with natural grasses, pottery made of clay, and sand for painting etc. The designs and symbols used represent favourable weather, good crops, successful hunting, illness cures, and other common experiences of the tribe. The images of dream and supernatural visions constitute the most creative works of Tribal Art. Since the tribes are isolated from the outside world, tribal art is unchanging in style. The tribes usually sustain themselves on the internal trade exchanges among the tribes.

Genres of Tribal Art

Inuit - It refers to the culturally similar group, residing in the Arctic region of Canada, Greenland, Russia, and the United States. The art forms here are from ivory & bone sculptures and figurative works on soft stones, such as soapstone & argillite.  The usual subjects are hunting, whaling, and other everyday activities.

Navajo Folk Art – Is the Tribal Art from Bluff town in Utah, US. With considerable exposure to the civilized world, this art form has diverse interesting creations, such as vibrantly painted wooden chicken, cowboy riding buffaloes, dog in business suit, etc. Horsehair, wool, and leather are mainly used. The Navajo pictorial rugs, pottery, and sand paintings are famous all over the world.

Hopi Tribe - resides in the high desert plateaus of North Arizona. Art is inherent in this deeply religious tribe, including hand woven kilts & sashes, baskets & pottery, jewellery, Katsina carvings, and Kachina dolls, & toys for children.

Iroquois Confederacy Homelands - They are in the upstate New York and across the border into Canada. They have a culture rich in tradition and history. Their motifs include   animals, sun, moon, and other natural elements. The various art forms of this tribe include basket weaving, beadwork, pottery, cornhusk artifacts, stonework, woodwork, and metal carving etc.

The uniqueness of each form of Tribal Art stems from the history and culture of the respective tribe. The recognition of tribes by the Federal Government along with the rights granted to the civilized world to interact with tribes had a major impact on Tribal Art and culture, giving way to Contemporary Tribal Art. Tribal artefacts are found in museums and souvenir stores all over the world.

Featured Image: Provided by Author – source captivedecals.com

Article by James Vasanth

James Vasanth writes a blog on Scottsdale Art Auction, about Western Arts, Fine arts and connecting the dots between online and offline.

 

Article publié pour la première fois le 08/03/2013

Giorgione - The Three Ages

Masters of Art: Giorgione (1477 – 1510)

Giorgio Barbarelli da Castelfranco;  or simply Giorgione; (c. 1477/8 – 1510) was a Venetian painter of the High Renaissance in Venice, whose career was cut off by his death at a little over thirty.

Giorgione is known for the elusive poetic quality of his work, though only about six surviving paintings are acknowledged for certain to be his work. The resulting uncertainty about the identity and meaning of his art has made Giorgione one of the most mysterious figures in European painting.

Movements: Renaissance, Naturalism, Monumentalism, Secularism

Together with Titian, who was slightly younger, he is the founder of the distinctive Venetian school of Italian Renaissance painting, which achieves much of its effect through colour and mood, and is traditionally contrasted with the reliance on a more linear disegno of Florentine painting.

The painter came from the small town of Castelfranco Veneto, 40 km inland from Venice. How early in boyhood he went to Venice we do not know, but stylistic evidence supports the statement of Carlo Ridolfi that he served his apprenticeship there under Giovanni Bellini; there he settled and made his fame.

Contemporary documents record that his gifts were recognized early. In 1500, when he was only twenty-three, he was chosen to paint portraits of the Doge Agostino Barbarigo and the condottiere Consalvo Ferrante.

In 1504 he was commissioned to paint an altarpiece in memory of another condottiere, Matteo Costanzo, in the cathedral of his native town, Castelfranco. In 1507 he received at the order of the Council of Ten part payment for a picture (subject not mentioned) on which he was engaged for the Hall of the Audience in the Doge’s Palace.

Giorgione - Portrait of Warrior with his Equerry

Giorgione – Portrait of Warrior with his Equerry

In 1507-1508 he was employed, with other artists of his generation, to decorate with frescoes the exterior of the newly rebuilt Fondaco dei Tedeschi (or German Merchants’ Hall) at Venice, having already done similar work on the exterior of the Casa Soranzo, the Casa Grimani alli Servi and other Venetian palaces. Very little of this work survives today.

Giorgione met with Leonardo da Vinci on the occasion of the Tuscan master’s visit to Venice in 1500. All accounts agree in representing Giorgione as a person of distinguished and romantic charm, a great lover and a musician, given to express in his art the sensuous and imaginative grace, touched with poetic melancholy, of the Venetian existence of his time. They represent him further as having made in Venetian painting an advance analogous to that made in Tuscan painting by Leonardo more than twenty years before; that is, as having released the art from the last shackles of archaic rigidity and placed it in possession of full freedom and the full mastery of its means.

He was very closely associated with Titian; Vasari says Giorgione was Titian’s master, while Ridolfi says they both were pupils of Bellini, and lived in his house. They worked together on the Fondaco dei Tedeschi frescoes, and Titian finished at least some paintings of Giorgione after his death, although which ones remains very controversial.

Giorgione also introduced a new range of subjects. Besides altarpieces and portraits he painted pictures that told no story, whether biblical or classical, or if they professed to tell a story, neglected the action and simply embodied in form and color moods of lyrical or romantic feeling, much as a musician might embody them in sounds. Innovating with the courage and felicity of genius, he had for a time an overwhelming influence on his contemporaries and immediate successors in the Venetian school, including Titian, Sebastiano del Piombo, Palma il Vecchio, il Cariani, Giulio Campagnola (and his brother), and even on his already eminent master, Giovanni Bellini. In the Venetian mainland, Giorgionismo strongly influenced Morto da Feltre, Domenico Capriolo, and Domenico Mancini.

Giorgione died, probably of the plague then raging, by October, 1510. October 1510 is also the date of a letter by Isabella d’Este to a Venetian friend; asking him to buy a painting by Giorgione; in the letter she is aware he is already dead. Significantly, the reply a month later said the painting was not to be had at any price.

Giorgione - Sleeping Venus

Giorgione – Sleeping Venus

His name and work continue to exercise a spell on posterity. But to identify and define, among the relics of his age and school, precisely what that work is, and to distinguish it from the similar work of other men whom his influence inspired, is a very difficult matter.

Though there are no longer any supporters of the “Pan Giorgionismus” which a century ago claimed for Giorgione nearly every painting of the time that at all resembles his manner, there are still, as then, exclusive critics who reduce to half a dozen the list of extant pictures which they will admit to be actually by this master.

Giorgione - The Three Philosophers

Giorgione – The Three Philosophers

The difficulty in making secure attributions of work by Giorgione’s hand dates from soon after his death, when some of his paintings were completed by other artists, and his considerable reputation also led to very early erroneous claims of attribution. The vast bulk of documentation for paintings in this period relates to large commissions for Church or government; the small domestic panels that make up the bulk of Giorgione’s oeuvre are always far less likely to be recorded. Other artists continued to work in his style for some years, and probably by the mid-century deliberately deceptive work had started.

Giorgione - The Three Ages

Giorgione – The Three Ages

Though he died at 33, Giorgione left a lasting legacy to be developed by Titian and 17th-century artists. Giorgione never subordinated line and colour to architecture, nor an artistic effect to a sentimental presentation. He was arguably the first Italian to paint landscapes with figures as movable pictures in their own frames with no devotional, allegorical, or historical purpose — and the first whose colours possessed that ardent, glowing, and melting intensity which was so soon to typify the work of all the Venetian School

Let’s enjoy some of his other most celebrated works:

Hope you enjoyed the article as much as i did compiling the info and the images! See you next time!

Articles’ Images are in the public domain because their copyright has expired, and are available through Wikimedia

This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

Article publié pour la première fois le 11/09/2012

Alfred Stevens - Femme a la poupee Japonaise

Life and Paintings of Alfred Stevens (1823 – 1906)

Alfred Émile Léopold Stevens (1823 – 1906) was a Belgian painter born in Brussels. He came from a family involved with the visual arts: his older brother Joseph (1816–1892) and his son Léopold (1866–1935) were painters, while another brother Arthur (1825–99) was an art dealer and critic. His father, who had fought in the Napoleonic wars in the army of William I of the Netherlands, was an art collector who owned several watercolors by Eugène Delacroix, among other artists. His mother’s parents ran Café de l’Amitié in Brussels, a meeting place for politicians, writers, and artists. All the Stevens children benefited from the people they met there, and the social skills they acquired in growing up around important people.

Alfred Stevens - What is Called Vagrancy

Alfred Stevens – What is Called Vagrancy

After the death of his father in 1837, Stevens left middle school to begin study at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, where he knew François Navez, the Neo-Classical painter and former student of Jacques-Louis David who was its director and an old friend of Stevens’s grandfather. Following a traditional curriculum, he drew from casts of classical sculpture for the first two years, and then drew from live models. In 1843, Stevens went to Paris, joining his brother Joseph who already was there. He was admitted to the École des Beaux-Arts, the most important art school in Paris. Although it is said that he became a student of its director Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, this is likely not true.

An early picture by Stevens, The Pardon or Absolution (Hermitage, St. Petersburg), signed and dated 1849, shows his mastery of a conventional naturalistic style which owes much to 17th-century Dutch genre painting. Like the Belgian painter and friend with whom he stayed in Paris, Florent Joseph Marie Willems (1823–1905), Stevens carefully studied works by painters such as Gerard ter Borch and Gabriel Metsu.

Stevens’s work was shown publicly for the first time in 1851, when three of his paintings were admitted to the Brussels Salon. He was awarded a third-class medal at the Paris Salon in 1853, and a second-class medal at the Universal Exposition in Paris in 1855. His ‘Ce qu’on appelle le vagabondage‘ [What is called vagrancy] (Musée d’Orsay, Paris) attracted the attention of Napoleon III who, as a result of the scene in the picture, ordered that soldiers no longer be used to pick up the poor from the streets.

Alfred Stevens - The Japanese Mask aka Intrigue

Alfred Stevens – The Japanese Mask aka Intrigue

Two other paintings he exhibited at the Salon in Antwerp that year, Chez soi or At Home (present location unknown) and The Painter and his Model (Walters Art Museum, Baltimore), introduced subjects from “la vie moderne” for which he became known: an elegant young woman in contemporary dress and the artist in his studio. In 1857, Stevens made his first important sale to a private collector, when Consolation was bought for a rumored 6,000 francs by the Berlin collector and dealer Ravéné. At the same time, he and his brother were becoming part of the art world of Paris, meeting people such as the Goncourt brothers, Théophile Gautier, and Alexandre Dumas at the salons of Princess Mathilde as well as popular cafés.

In 1858, Stevens married Marie Blanc, who came from a rich Belgian family and old friends of the Stevens’s. Eugène Delacroix was a witness at the ceremony.

During the 1860s, Stevens became an immensely successful painter, known for his paintings of elegant modern women. His exhibits at the Salons in Paris and Brussels attracted favorable critical attention and buyers. An excellent example of his work during this time is La Dame en Rose or Woman in Pink (Musées royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels), painted in 1866, which combines a view of a fashionably dressed woman in an interior with a detailed examination of Japanese objects, a fashionable taste called japonisme of which Stevens was an early enthusiast.

In 1863, he received the Legion of Honor (Chevalier) from the Belgian government. In 1867, he won a first-class medal at the Universal Exposition in Paris, where he and Jan August Hendrik Leys were the stars of the Belgian section, and was promoted to Officer of the Legion of Honor. His friends included Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas, Charles Baudelaire, Berthe Morisot, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Frédéric Bazille, and Puvis de Chavannes, and he was a regular in the group that gathered at the Café Guerbois in Paris.

Alfred Stevens - The Bath

Alfred Stevens – The Bath

Stevens fought for the French during the siege of Paris in the Franco-Prussian War, but returned to Belgium with his wife and family before the Paris Commune. They returned after the war, and Stevens continued to achieve critical acclaim as well as great success with collectors. In 1875, he bought a grand house and garden in Paris on rue des Martyrs, which appeared in his paintings as well as those of other artists, including Édouard Manet’s The Croquet Party (Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main) from 1873.

Alfred Stevens - Preparing for the Ball

Alfred Stevens – Preparing for the Ball

In 1878, he was made a Commander of the Legion of Honor and received another first-class medal at the Salon.
Despite earning a considerable income through the sale of his paintings, Stevens found that a combination of bad investments and excessive spending caused him great financial difficulties during the 1880s. An additional expense came from summers by the sea, which a doctor told Stevens in 1880 were essential for his health. Thus the artist was glad to agree when the Paris dealer Georges Petit offered him 50,000 francs to finance his vacation in exchange for the paintings Stevens produced during that time.

This deal, which lasted for three years, resulted in the sea becoming an important subject for him, and over the rest of his career, he painted hundreds of views of popular resorts along the Normandy coast and the Midi in the south. Many of them are painted in a sketchy style that shows the influence of the Impressionists. Stevens also began to take private students, including Sarah Bernhardt, who became a close personal friend, and William Merritt Chase.

The single most important work from the second half of Stevens’s career is the monumental Panorama du Siècle, 1789–1889, which he painted with Henri Gervex. Stevens painted the women and details and Gervex the men, with the help of fifteen assistants. It was shown to great acclaim at the International Exhibition held in Paris in 1889. He also received several great professional tributes. In 1895, a large exhibition of his work was held in Brussels.

 

Alfred Stevens - A la Fillette au Canard

Alfred Stevens – A la Fillette au Canard

In 1900, Stevens was honored by the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris with the first retrospective exhibition ever given to a living artist. Supported by patrons led by the Comtesse de Greffulhe, it achieved social cachet as well as popular success. In 1905, he was the only living artist allowed to exhibit in a retrospective show of Belgian art in Brussels. Despite these exhibitions, he was not able to sell enough of his work to manage well financially. Having outlived his brothers and most of his friends, he died in Paris in 1906, living alone in modest rooms.

Alfred Stevens - Lovelorn

Alfred Stevens – Lovelorn

Hope you enjoyed the article as much as i did compiling the info and the images! See you next time!

Articles’ Images are in the public domain because their copyright has expired or are displayed here under the “ fair use” copyright law, and are available through Wikipedia & Wikimedia.

This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

Article publié pour la première fois le 20/02/2014