Paul Cézanne - Steinbruch Bibemus

Modern art includes artistic works produced during the period extending roughly from the 1860s to the 1970s, and denotes the style and philosophy of the art produced during that era.

Le Chahut by George Seurat

Le Chahut by George Seurat

The term is usually associated with art in which the traditions of the past have been thrown aside in a spirit of experimentation. Modern artists experimented with new ways of seeing and with fresh ideas about the nature of materials and functions of art. A tendency away from the narrative, which was characteristic for the traditional arts, toward abstraction is characteristic of much modern art. More recent artistic production is often called Contemporary art or Postmodern art.

Modern art begins with the heritage of painters like Vincent van Gogh, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, Georges Seurat and Henri de Toulouse Lautrec all of whom were essential for the development of modern art. At the beginning of the 20th century Henri Matisse and several other young artists including the pre-cubist Georges Braque, André Derain, Raoul Dufy and Maurice de Vlaminck revolutionized the Paris art world with “wild”, multi-colored, expressive landscapes and figure paintings that the critics called Fauvism.

Henri Matisse’s two versions of The Dance signified a key point in his career and in the development of modern painting. It reflected Matisse’s incipient fascination with primitive art: the intense warm color of the figures against the cool blue-green background and the rhythmical succession of the dancing nudes convey the feelings of emotional liberation and hedonism.

Georges Braque - Violin and Candlestick

Georges Braque – Violin and Candlestick

Initially influenced by Toulouse Lautrec, Gauguin and other late 19th century innovators Pablo Picasso made his first cubist paintings based on Cézanne’s idea that all depiction of nature can be reduced to three solids: cube, sphere and cone.

Analytic cubism was jointly developed by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, exemplified by Violin and Candlestick, Paris, from about 1908 through 1912. Analytic cubism, the first clear manifestation of cubism, was followed by Synthetic cubism, practised by Braque, Picasso, Fernand Léger, Juan Gris, Albert Gleizes, Marcel Duchamp and several other artists into the 1920s. Synthetic cubism is characterized by the introduction of different textures, surfaces, collage elements, papier collé and a large variety of merged subject matter. The notion of modern art is closely related to Modernism.

In Make your ideas art weekly updated list you can join our journey in modern art’s movement. We’ll be starting from Impressionism, since we think it’s essential for understanding the modernism movement’s roots, and will be moving back to today!

So with no further ado, let’s get started!

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Spyros Thalassinos

History of Modern Art

A brief journey to the history of modern art! Covering 17 Art Movements from Impressionism to Minimalism!

Source: http://makeyourideasart.com

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  1. 1  History of Modern Art: Impressionism

    History of Modern Art: Impressionism

    In this short series, we'll review the history of modern art , starting from Impressionism and going through the years to reach back at today. You might object how modern are really art movements over 100 years old. Still considering the timeline of art history that dates back to the first cave drawings, then i think a mere 100 years are more than modern! I hope you join me to this journey, and enjoy it as much as i do.

  2. 2  History of Modern Art: Post-Impressionism

    History of Modern Art: Post-Impressionism

    Post-Impressionism is the term coined by the British artist and art critic Roger Fry in 1910 to describe the development of French art since Manet. Fry used the term when he organized the 1910 exhibition Manet and the Post-Impressionists.

  3. 3  History of Modern Art: Pointillism

    History of Modern Art: Pointillism

    Pointillism is a technique of painting in which small, distinct dots of pure color are applied in patterns to form an image. Georges Seurat and Paul Signac developed the technique in 1886, branching from Impressionism.

  4. 4  History of Modern Art: Symbolism

    History of Modern Art: Symbolism

    We’ll be continuing our exploration in modern art movements with Symbolism. Symbolism was a late nineteenth-century art movement of French, Russian and Belgian origin in poetry and other arts.

  5. 5  History of Modern Art: Expressionism

    History of Modern Art: Expressionism

    Expressionism was a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas.

  6. 6  History of Modern Art: Fauvism

    History of Modern Art: Fauvism

    Fauvism is the style of les Fauves (French for "the wild beasts"), a short-lived and loose group of early twentieth-century Modern artists whose works emphasized painterly qualities and strong color over the representational or realistic values retained by Impressionism.

  7. 7  History of Modern Art: Cubism

    History of Modern Art: Cubism

    Cubism is a 20th century avant-garde art movement, pioneered by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music, literature and architecture.

  8. 8  History of Modern Art: Futurism

    History of Modern Art: Futurism

    Futurism was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy in the early 20th century. It emphasized and glorified themes associated with contemporary concepts of the future, including speed, technology, youth and violence, and objects such as the car, the airplane and the industrial city. It was largely an Italian phenomenon, though there were parallel movements in Russia, England and elsewhere.

  9. 9  History of Modern Art: Dada

    History of Modern Art: Dada

    Dada was an informal international movement, with participants in Europe and North America. The beginnings of Dada correspond to the outbreak of World War I.

  10. 10  History of Modern Art: Suprematism and Constructivism

    History of Modern Art: Suprematism and Constructivism

    Suprematism was an art movement, focused on basic geometric forms, such as circles, squares, lines, and rectangles, painted in a limited range of colors. It was founded by Kazimir Malevich in Russia, in 1915. The term suprematism refers to an art based upon “the supremacy of pure artistic feeling” rather than on visual depiction of objects.

  11. 11  History of Modern Art: De Stijl

    History of Modern Art: De Stijl

    De Stijl, Dutch for "The Style", also known as neoplasticism, was a Dutch artistic movement founded in 1917. In a narrower sense, the term De Stijl is used to refer to a body of work from 1917 to 1931 founded in the Netherlands.

  12. 12  History of Modern Art: Bauhaus

    History of Modern Art: Bauhaus

    Staatliches Bauhaus, commonly known simply as Bauhaus, was a school in Germany that combined crafts and the fine arts, and was famous for the approach to design that it publicized and taught. It operated from 1919 to 1933. At that time the German term Bauhaus, literally "house of construction" stood for "School of Building".

  13. 13  History of Modern Art: Art Deco

    History of Modern Art: Art Deco

    Hi folks, welcome back to our journey in the history of modern art. Today we'll be reviewing Art Deco! Art Deco or Deco, is an influential visual arts design style which first appeared in France during the 1920s, flourished internationally during the 30s and 40s, then waned in the post-World War II era.

  14. 14  History of Modern Art: Surrealism

    History of Modern Art: Surrealism

    Hello folks, welcome back to our weekly series of History of Modern Art. Today we'll review the movement of Surrealism. Surrealism is a cultural movement that began in the early 1920s, and is best known for its visual artworks and writings.

  15. 15  History of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism

    History of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism

    Hello folks! Welcome to our weekly series on the history of modern art! Today on review is the abstract expressionism movement. Abstract expressionism was an American post-World War II art movement. It was the first specifically American movement to achieve international influence and put New York City at the center of the western art world, a role formerly filled by Paris.

  16. 16  History of Modern Art: Pop Art

    History of Modern Art: Pop Art

    Hello everyone, today in our History of Modern Art series we'll review the pop art movement! Pop art is an art movement that emerged in the mid 1950s in Britain and in the late 1950s in the United States. Pop art presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular culture such as advertising, news, etc.

  17. 17  History of Modern Art: Minimalism

    History of Modern Art: Minimalism

    Minimalism describes movements in various forms of art and design, especially visual art and music, where the work is set out to expose the essence or identity of a subject through eliminating all non-essential forms, features or concepts. Minimalism is any design or style in which the simplest and fewest elements are used to create the maximum effect.

  18. 18  Timeline Eons

    Timeline Eons

    When is a historical timeline truly out of this world? When it is thousands of times longer than the Earth's circumference. onlinecolleges.com - 10 History Apps That Immerse You in the Past . Easily one of the most intelligent-if not the most intelligent-apps that I have ever encountered.

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