Raphael Sanzio - Woman with a Veil (La Donna Velata)

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483 – 1520)

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (1483 – 1520), better known simply as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form and ease of composition and for its visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur.

Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period.

So grab a coffee and prepare for some heavy scrolling, because we have a lot to see! I promise you, in the end you will find it was worth it!

Movements: Renaissance, Idealism, Classicism

Raphael was enormously productive, running an unusually large workshop, and despite his death at 37, a large body of his work remains. Many of his works are found in the Apostolic Palace of The Vatican, where the frescoed Raphael Rooms were the central, and the largest, work of his career. The best known work is The School of Athens in the Vatican Stanza della Segnatura. After his early years in Rome much of his work was self-designed, but for the most part executed by the workshop from his drawings, with considerable loss of quality.

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The School of Athens

Raphael Sanzio -The School of Athens

He was extremely influential in his lifetime, though outside Rome his work was mostly known from his collaborative printmaking. After his death, the influence of his great rival Michelangelo was more widespread until the 18th and 19th centuries, when Raphael’s more serene and harmonious qualities were again regarded as the highest models.

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Three Graces

Raphael Sanzio -The Three Graces

His career falls naturally into three phases and three styles, first described by Giorgio Vasari: his early years in Umbria, then a period of about four years (from 1504–1508) absorbing the artistic traditions of Florence, followed by his last hectic and triumphant twelve years in Rome, working for two Popes and their close associates.

Raphael was born in the small but artistically significant Central Italian city of Urbino in the Marche region, where his father Giovanni Santi was court painter to the Duke. The reputation of the court had been established by Federico III da Montefeltro, a highly successful condottiere who had been created Duke of Urbino by the Pope—Urbino formed part of the Papal States—and who died the year before Raphael was born.

The emphasis of Federico’s court was rather more literary than artistic, but Giovanni Santi was a poet of sorts as well as a painter, and had written a rhymed chronicle of the life of Federico, and both wrote the texts and produced the decor for masque-like court entertainments. His poem to Federico shows him as keen to show awareness of the most advanced North Italian painters, and Early Netherlandish artists as well.

His mother Màgia died in 1491 when Raphael was eight, followed on August 1, 1494 by his father, who had already remarried. Orphaned at eleven, Raphael’s formal guardian became his only paternal uncle Bartolomeo, a priest, who subsequently engaged in litigation with his stepmother.

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Voyage of Galatea

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Holy Family

Raphael Sanzio -The Holy Family

His first documented work was the Baronci altarpiece for the church of Saint Nicholas of Tolentino in Città di Castello, a town halfway between Perugia and Urbino. Evangelista da Pian di Meleto, who had worked for his father, was also named in the commission. It was commissioned in 1500 and finished in 1501; now only some cut sections and a preparatory drawing remain.In the following years he painted works for other churches there, including the “Mond Crucifixion” (about 1503) and the Brera Wedding of the Virgin (1504), and for Perugia, such as the Oddi Altarpiece. He very probably also visited Florence in this period.

Raphael led a “nomadic” life, working in various centres in Northern Italy, but spent a good deal of time in Florence, perhaps from about 1504. However, although there is traditional reference to a “Florentine period” of about 1504-8, he was possibly never a continuous resident there.

By the end of 1508, he had moved to Rome, where he lived for the rest of his life. He was invited by the new Pope Julius II, perhaps at the suggestion of his architect Donato Bramante, and then engaged on St. Peter’s, who came from just outside Urbino and was distantly related to Raphael. Unlike Michelangelo, who had been kept hanging around in Rome for several months after his first summons,Raphael was immediately commissioned by Julius to fresco what was intended to become the Pope’s private library at the Vatican Palace.

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Adoration of the Magi Oddi altar predella

Raphael Sanzio -The Adoration of the Magi (Oddi altar, predella)

Raphael eventually had a workshop of fifty pupils and assistants, many of whom later became significant artists in their own right. This was arguably the largest workshop team assembled under any single old master painter, and much higher than the norm. They included established masters from other parts of Italy, probably working with their own teams as sub-contractors, as well as pupils and journeymen. We have very little evidence of the internal working arrangements of the workshop, apart from the works of art themselves, often very difficult to assign to a particular hand.

Raphael’s premature death on Good Friday (April 6, 1520), which was possibly his 37th birthday, was caused by a night of excessive sex with Luti, after which he fell into a fever and, not telling his doctors that this was its cause, was given the wrong cure, which killed him. Vasari also says that Raphael had also been born on a Good Friday, which in 1483 fell on March 28.

Whatever the cause, in his acute illness, which lasted fifteen days, Raphael was composed enough to receive the last rites, and to put his affairs in order. He dictated his will, in which he left sufficient funds for his mistress’s care, entrusted to his loyal servant Baviera, and left most of his studio contents to Giulio Romano and Penni. At his request, Raphael was buried in the Pantheon.

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Entombment

Raphael Sanzio -The Entombment

His funeral was extremely grand, attended by large crowds. The inscription in his marble sarcophagus, an elegiac distich written by Pietro Bembo, reads: “Ille hic est Raffael, timuit quo sospite vinci, rerum magna parens et moriente mori.” Meaning: “Here lies that famous Raphael by whom Nature feared to be conquered while he lived, and when he was dying, feared herself to die.”

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Council of Gods

Raphael Sanzio – The Council of Gods

Raphael was highly admired by his contemporaries, although his influence on artistic style in his own century was less than that of Michelangelo. Mannerism, beginning at the time of his death, and later the Baroque, took art “in a direction totally opposed” to Raphael’s qualities; “with Raphael’s death, classic art – the High Renaissance – subsided”, as Walter Friedländer put it.

 Let’s close with some of his other most celebrated works:
Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Prophet Isaiah

Raphael Sanzio -The Prophet Isaiah

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio St Michael and the Dragon

Raphael Sanzio -St Michael and the Dragon

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio St George and the Dragon

Raphael Sanzio -St George and the Dragon

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Sposalizio The Engagement of Virgin Mary

Raphael Sanzio -Sposalizio (The Engagement of Virgin Mary)

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Pope Leo X with Cardinals Giulio de Medici and Luigi de Rossi

Raphael Sanzio -Pope Leo X with Cardinals Giulio de’ Medici and Luigi

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Madonna with Beardless St Joseph

Raphael Sanzio -Madonna with Beardless St Joseph

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Woman with a Veil La Donna Velata

Raphael Sanzio – Woman with a Veil (La Donna Velata)

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Judgment of Solomon

Raphael Sanzio – The Judgment of Solomon

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Allegory The Knights Dream

Raphael Sanzio – Allegory (The Knight’s Dream)

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Wedding Banquet of Cupid and Psyche

Raphael Sanzio -Wedding Banquet of Cupid and Psyche

 

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Granduca Madonna

Raphael Sanzio -The Granduca Madonna

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio The Canigiani Madonna

Raphael Sanzio -The Canigiani Madonna

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Madonna with Beardless St Joseph

Raphael Sanzio -Madonna with Beardless St Joseph

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Madonna of Belvedere Madonna del Prato

Raphael Sanzio -Madonna of Belvedere (Madonna del Prato)

 

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Madonna del Cardellino

Raphael Sanzio -Madonna del Cardellino

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Madonna del Baldacchino

Raphael Sanzio -Madonna del Baldacchino

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Madonna and Child The Tempi Madonna

Raphael Sanzio -Madonna and Child (The Tempi Madonna)

Masters of Art: Raphael Sanzio (1483   1520)   Raphael Sanzio Bridgewater Madonna

Raphael Sanzio -Bridgewater Madonna

 

Hope you enjoyed the article as much as i did compiling the info and the images! See you next time!

Articles’ Images are in the public domain because their copyright has expired, and are available through Wikimedia

This Articles’ text is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA License since it partially uses material from Wikipedia.

 

 

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